How to cheer yourself up

Be proactive. Do something.How? I’m doing it right now.

First, I notice that I’m feeling a little down and I know that I should do something about this. So the first things to do are:

  • Have insight into your condition.
  • Decide that the problem is going to be changing.
  • Be proactive. Do something.

Everyone has a different happy place, or happy activity, but for me one of them is to go to my favourite coffee shop, order coffee, play music through my headphones, write Quora answers involving some creativity via Photoshop.

The principles here are:

I can do this even if there isn’t anyone else available for coffee with me. Having a conversation with a friend would be good too, but that can’t always be arranged, and loneliness can often be a catalyst for a sad mood.

smile

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Making your face smile will make you feel happier. Doesn’t make sense, but it works.

So today, I checked how some of my metrics were going, and the answer was not very well. I knew that I had to keep going — giving up wasn’t an option. I recognized that I was feeling a little down, and I put the coffee shop solution into place.

  • This is not the only way. Physical activity is one of the best ways to cheer up.
    • Move your body.
    • Walk, run, dance.
    • Enjoy the endorphins, and get fit too.
  • Know yourself enough to know:
    • Where your happy places are.
    • What your happy activities are.
    • What are the circumstances where your mood needs ‘saving’ so you can act quickly.
    • Moods are transient. Be patient.
  • Do things even when you are happy to keep your mood buoyant.
    • Prevention is better than cure.
  • Evaluate.
    • Is your ‘remedy’ working?
    • If not, tweak a bit.
  • Make sure you do no harm.
    • Not all cheer-up activities are good for you.

I could also have gone for a walk. Exercise is great and it fills you with feel-good endorphins. Right now, it’s too hot and sunny for that and I need to be sun-smart. I’ll go for a walk before sunset this evening.

Here’s to getting cheerful!

  • Have insight into the condition.
  • Decide that the problem is going to be changing.
  • Be proactive. Do something.

Everyone has a different happy place, or happy activity, but for me one of them is to go to my favourite coffee shop, order coffee, play music through my headphones, write Quora answers involving some creativity via Photoshop.

The principles here are:

I can do this even if there isn’t anyone else available for coffee with me. Having a conversation with a friend would be good too, but that can’t always be arranged, and loneliness can often be a catalyst for a sad mood.

So today, I checked how some of my metrics were going, and the answer was not very well. I knew that I had to keep going — giving up wasn’t an option. I recognized that I was feeling a little down, and I put the coffee shop solution into place.

  • This is not the only way. Physical activity is one of the best ways to cheer up.
    • Move your body.
    • Walk, run, dance.
    • Enjoy the endorphins, and get fit too.
  • Know yourself enough to know:
    • Where your happy places are.
    • What your happy activities are.
    • What are the circumstances where your mood needs ‘saving’ so you can act quickly.
    • Moods are transient. Be patient.
  • Do things even when you are happy to keep your mood buoyant.
    • Prevention is better than cure.
  • Evaluate.
    • Is your ‘remedy’ working?
    • If not, tweak a bit.
  • Make sure you do no harm.
    • Not all cheer-up activities are good for you.

I could also have gone for a walk. Exercise is great and it fills you with feel-good endorphins. Right now, it’s too hot and sunny for that and I need to be sun-smart. I’ll go for a walk before sunset this evening.

Here’s to getting cheerful!

Hey, I’m not a doctor, or a psychiatrist. This is just a simple thing I do to cheer up, and it works for me. It’s conversational and has more entertainment value, rather than even trying to be medical advice.  You guys should only trust professionals for serious medical advice.